Amy’s Story

Amy’s mother was 15 when she was conceived. She was at a high school party when she met Amy’s biological father. He was 22 and had no business being at a party with high school students. While at the party, he got Amy’s mother drunk and then he raped her. As part of a very catholic family, Amy’s mom kept it all a secret until she found out she was pregnant. Amy’s biological uncle was in school with her mother so she told him about her pregnancy and he relayed it to her biological father. Her biological father harassed Amy’s grandparents and told them her mom was pregnant. All three tried to pressure her into abortion. However, Amy’s mother refused. Amy was born in May of 1987. After she was born her biological father skipped town after her grandparents filed a police report on him for rape- Amy being the proof. When she was 3 she was adopted by her mom’s first husband and the father of her siblings. He is who she calls “Dad”.

Amy’s mom says that she is the best thing that ever happened to her. She has never been treated any different than any of her other siblings. When Amy first found out the circumstances regarding her conception she felt ashamed. She never told anyone until recently. While at work one day her co-workers were having a conversation about abortion. They all agreed that abortion was acceptable in cases of rape and incest. They then looked at Amy and asked her views. Amy replied, “I’m sorry, I don’t agree with anything that is meant to end my life. I was conceived in rape.” It was then that Amy’s Pro-Life convictions were solidified. She says, “I realized [that] I humanized babies of rape at that moment and [now] I have a unique opportunity to show people we are humans and valuable!!” Amy says her comment made her co-workers uncomfortable but quotes Gianna Jessen, a survivor of a failed abortion, saying, “I didn’t survive to make everyone comfortable. I survived so I can stir things up a bit.”

I asked her how she feels about people using situations like hers and her mom’s as justification for abortion. “I honestly do not think these people are REALLY thinking about what they are saying,” she says. “They’re saying that a whole group of people are unworthy of life. I feel sorry for them. That is why I decided to speak out, to humanize babies like me.” Many abortion advocates say that they are empowering women by making sure they have the option of abortion. However, Amy says there is nothing empowering about abortion. “You’re telling a woman she is too weak to have a baby. I think it’s taking away what make us women powerful. Men can’t make babies, its unique to our gender and it is in our nature and it’s a magical, powerful thing.” I ask her what she believes empowerment is instead. Her response is, “Empowerment is the process of getting stronger and more confident. Growth and empowerment happen through adversity, overcoming the obstacles you run into in life. Abortion is the opposite of that.” Amy says that what these women really need is someone to tell that they are strong enough. They are strong enough to bring this innocent life into the world and that they can take back control of their lives. “They need love, compassion, and lots of support.”

Amy once asked her grandparents why they wanted her mother to kill her. Their response was, “We didn’t know you then.” Imagine all the babies that did not get the chance Amy did. Think about all the lives we will never know. What is our world missing out on? Just because we don’t know them yet doesn’t mean we can end their lives. Abortion doesn’t empower women; it is another act of violence against an innocent victim. Let us speak up and fight for all humans, no matter their circumstances, and fight for the dignity and humanity of their lives. Because stories like Amy’s deserve to be heard.

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